This is how the Japanese said goodbye to the second building in Sega-Akihabara

This is how the Japanese said goodbye to the second building in Sega-Akihabara

Following the previously announced closure of the Sega-Akihabara Second Building, located on the southern edge of the area, on August 30, several groups of Japanese gathered in the area to see him off.

This is how the Japanese said goodbye to the second building in Sega-Akihabara 1603218507 This is how the Japanese said goodbye to the second building in Sega-Akihabara 1603218508 This is how the Japanese said goodbye to the second building in Sega-Akihabara 1603218509 This is how the Japanese said goodbye to the second building in Sega-Akihabara 1603218510 This is how the Japanese said goodbye to the second building in Sega-Akihabara 1603218510 This is how the Japanese said goodbye to the second building in Sega-Akihabara 1603218511

Originally opened in October 2003 by Sega under the name "Akihabara Kigo," this arcade room began welcoming gamers just as the rise of otaku culture really began to gain traction, and to date it had weathered the transition from passing from a simple shopping place to a tourist destination, which attracted gamers from all over Japan and even abroad.

Standing on a corner in front of the Manseibashi Bridge that spans the Kandagawa River, the unobstructed view of Sega-Akihabara's Second Building made the skyscraper a main canvas for huge murals promoting the latest release of a video game or anime in production.

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The most likely culprit for this shutdown would be the business downturn caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, which has dramatically reduced the number of visitors to Akihabara, and even among those who dare to visit, having to stay in a space Closed like this while using a machine that is not properly sanitized between uses is probably not the most attractive outlook. The Sega-Akihabara Second Building had been temporarily in place during the spring of this year given the declaration of the state of emergency in Tokyo, and although the establishment reopened on June 12, it seems that the meeting will be shorter than that everyone thought.

Yet even before the pandemic began, the arcade business in Japan was already in steady decline, as illustrated by the closure of the legendary Warehouse Kawasaki arcade. The continuous improvement of home video game consoles have largely eliminated the need to go beyond the comfort of your home to play the latest titles or find human companions, so it is very likely that the days of the life of the Second Sega-Akihabara building were already numbered for a long time.

Source: Otakomu

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